3/31/11

A TALK WITH ONIR ON HIS UPCOMING FILM "I AM"

Here is our talk with filmmaker Onir about his upcoming film I AM. Onir has in the past made critically acclaimed films like My Brother Nikhil and also ventured into mainstream cinema with Bas Ek Pal and Sorry Bhai. The film I AM consists of four different stories; Abhimanyu, Megha, Afia and Omar. With an interesting cast and really intriguing story lines, I AM is definitely the biggest thing that has happened to Independent Cinema in India in recent times.

3/14/11

Q4C HOLDS ITS FIRST SHORT FILM SCREENING IN NEW DELHI



As we mentioned in the footnote of our post about the short film, Just That Sort of A Day, Cue For Change is now more than a blog on cinema and in fact is trying to establish an offline presence by screening short films around the country! We plan on doing so by tying up with college film societies in India. And what place better than the capital of the country to kick-start the idea? Hence, we tied up with Gargi College in New Delhi an screened Abhay Kumar's brilliant short film, Just That Sort of A Day. 

3/8/11

Q4C EXCLUSIVE: NIKHIL TANEJA ON TWI-FI AWARDS



Nikhil Taneja, the founder of the Twi Fi Awards speaks to Cue For Change in an exclusive interview on the recently released nominations for the same! There has been huge buzz and a mixed response about the nominations on Twitter and Facebook. Nikhil opens up on this issue...

3/4/11

NOT JUST THAT SORT OF A FILM

In a long, long time, nothing has left us as mesmerized as Abhay Kumar's short film  Just That Sort of A Day. It not only incorporates a beautiful theme, but also presents a unique and non treaded path in film-making. 


The story revolves around the happenings of a given day in the lives of some characters who have no names,no faces. Using basic animation and stick figures, Abhay and his gifted team have pulled off a sheer masterpiece. JTSAD is a story where its characters question the meaning of their lives, they look for the thread that binds their pasts, presents and futures. The fact that none of them have a name or a face, makes it easier for the viewer to associate and relate with the story. The presentation is very simple and the beauty is that it addresses a very complex theme. Rajat Kapoor has rightly said, "This is a film that is as complex as it is simple; and here is a filmmaker who is innovative and  brilliant..."